When it comes to the phrase “gentlemen agreement,” many people may be confused about how to spell it correctly.

Firstly, it`s important to note that “gentlemen agreement” is actually a somewhat archaic term. The more commonly used phrase nowadays is “gentlemen`s agreement,” which refers to a non-legally binding agreement made between two parties based on trust and honor.

Now, onto the spelling. “Gentlemen`s agreement” should always be spelled with an apostrophe and an “s” at the end of “gentlemen.” This is because “gentlemen” is a plural noun and the agreement is made between multiple gentlemen, not just one.

However, it is not uncommon to see the phrase spelled incorrectly without the apostrophe and “s,” such as “gentleman agreement” or “gentleman`s agreement.” These misspellings can result in confusion and may affect the credibility of the writer or publication.

Additionally, it`s worth noting that while “gentlemen`s agreement” may have a certain connotation of exclusivity, it is important to be inclusive in language and avoid perpetuating gender stereotypes. Some alternative phrases to consider could be “informal agreement” or “unwritten agreement.”

In summary, if you`re writing about a non-legally binding agreement between multiple parties based on trust and honor, you`ll want to use the phrase “gentlemen`s agreement” spelled with an apostrophe and “s” at the end of “gentlemen.” Remember to stay inclusive in language and avoid perpetuating gender stereotypes.